Lt. Col. Pelly

Lieutenant Colonel Raymond T. Pelly
Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry
Pelly

Pelly always was a nervous temperament and the trenches came harder on him than on some others but you are quite wrong in imagining he is not full of courage for I know him to be. And at Frise when H.Q. was shelled he absolutely refused to go into the cellars until the last servant had taken to his hiding place.

(Agar Adamson to wife, 2 Jan 1916)

Raymond Theodore Pelly was born on 30 July 1881 in Woodford England. He served with the Royal North Lancashire Regiment from 1900 to 1914. As a member of the Governor General of Canada’s staff, in August 1914, he enlisted as a major with PPCLI under Colonel Farquhar.

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Lt. Col. Worsnop

Lieutenant Colonel Charlie Worsnop
50th & 75th Battalions

Worsnop

Major Worsnop, who is heavy and strong in physique, was a source of strength to any forward line, and one of his most notable achievements was to kick off, catch the ball on the bounce, touch down, and kick the goal.

(Vancouver World, 31 Jan 1916, 2)

Born on 5 August 1879 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Charles Benson Worsnop was the son of British Colonel Charles Arthur Benson. Due to his connection with British museums of science and art, his father had travelled to Philadelphia for the 1876 Centennial Exposition and stayed for five years before moving to Canada. The younger Worsnop grew up in British Columbia and joined the 6th Regiment. A noted Vancouver sportsman, the six-foot-three Worsnop excelled as the city’s rugby captain and later team coach.

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Lt. Col. Kirkpatrick

Lieutenant Colonel J.R. Kirkpatrick
55th (New Brunswick and P.E.I.) Battalion
Kirkpatrick

I know lots of men who would go, but they are not prepared to serve under mushroom officers who don’t know their duty. An officer, to be a good officer, must be trained not picked up politically or otherwise because he has an uncle or an aunt or somebody connected with the titled people we have around. I am speaking now more particularly of my own province.

(Senator James Domville, Debates, 4 May 1916, 413)

Born on 18 December 1863 in Debec Junction, New Brunswick, James Renfrew Kirkpatrick was a farmer and long-time militiaman. He had served for nearly thirty years in the 67th (Carleton Light Infantry). As commanding officer of regiment, he travelled to Valcartier in August 1914 during the formation of the First Contingent.

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Lt. Col. Reed

Lieutenant Colonel Le Grande Reed
170th (Mississauga Horse) Battalion

During the last few months the streets of Toronto have been overrun with thousands of untrained men in uniforms accosting with such manner and expressions as have aroused constant indignation. These men perforce of circumstances untutored in their duties, have done their best. I claim that there is not one civilian man in each thousand in Toronto who has not been most strongly and continuously urged to join the colours.

(Reed to Gen. Logie, 26 June 1916)

Days after the declaration of war against Germany, Toronto insurance broker Le Grand Reed joined the 9th Mississauga Horse. He worked through the local recruiting depot until December 1915 when he was authorized to organize the 170th Battalion from the Ontario capital. A native of Toronto, Reed was born on 8 October 1876.

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Lt. Col. Street

Lieutenant Colonel D.R. Street
77th (Ottawa) Battalion
Street

I merely add without comment, we hear that the men of the 77th battalion in Ottawa looted the Parliament Buildings the night of the fire. I am prepared to say this—I never thought it worth mentioning it, but my attention was brought to it yesterday–that the men of the 77th, as well as the Engineers, conducted themselves in the most orderly and becoming manner on that night…

 (Sam Hughes, Debates, 16 Feb 1916, 855)

Douglas Richmond Street was a member of the Governor General’s Foot Guards and director of the Ottawa Electric & Gas Company. He was born on 19 June 1864 in Fredericton, New Brunswick. In spring 1915, he was selected to raise a battalion from the Ottawa area.

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Lt. Col. Paquet

Lieutenant Colonel E.T. Paquet
57th (Canadien-Français) Battalion
Paquet

I wish every young man in Montreal would follow the example of the Highland Cadets, and occasionally, at the close of their day’s work put on uniforms, as you boys do and come down to train for work as real soldiers of the King instead of idling away their time on the streets as I see so many doing.

 (Paquet speech to Cadets, Montreal Gazette, 20 May 1915, 5)

Born on 2 January 1883 in Quebec City, Etienne Theodore Paquet was a member of an old, influential Quebec family and the son of a prominent Conservative politician of the same name. The younger Paquet was an official in the federal postmaster general’s office, a barrister and Inspector of Cadets for the province of Quebec. He was also a member of 17th Regiment for fifteen years before the Great War.

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Lt. Col. Smart

Lieutenant Colonel R.W. Smart
136th (Durham) Battalion
Smart1

In a recent letter to this office from an old Durhamite, now living in Western Ontario, this reference is made to Col. Smart: “Tell the young men what a privilege it will be to serve under him and say that for the honor of the old loyal country every man much do his duty.

(Canadian Statesman, 2 Dec 1915, 1)

Robert Wallace Smart was a third generation military officer and thirty-three year member of the 46th Regiment. Robert Smart was born on 3 December 1864 in Port Hope, Canada West. During the 1885 Rebellion, the twenty-year-old Smart volunteered with Colonel A. T. H. Williams’ Midland Battalion. His grandfather, David Smart had raised a cavalry troop to help put down the 1837 Upper Canadian Rebellion. Continue reading

Lt. Col. Laurie

Lieutenant Colonel R.P. Laurie
232nd (Saskatchewan Tigers) Battalion
Laurie_RP

Nothing except physical misfortune could prevent Mr. Laurie from taking a foremost place among the journalist of the west, for his ability is undoubted and he possess that indomitable courage which has characterized so many of the journalists of the west, and has played such a large part in the upbuilding of this boundless country.

 (Treherne Times, 1 Feb 1907, 7)

Born on 3 June 1873, in Barrie, Ontario, Reginald Peter Laurie was a Saskatchewan newspaper publisher and postmaster for Prince Albert. As a boy, Laurie had been an apprentice printer and made a career in journalism. He became editor of the Fort Frances Times and Virden Advance before moving west to be part-owner of the Prince Albert Times in 1905. Continue reading

Lt. Col. Dubuc

Lieutenant Colonel A.E. Dubuc, D.S.O.
22nd (French Canadian) Battalion

Dubuc

Let me start with the bad news: Major Dubuc was wounded again today by the explosion of a rifle grenade … The major bled profusely, which I think is a very good sign but did not lose consciousness. In fact he even retained his usual good humour … The Major has had wonderful luck in each of his misfortunes. To be wounded twice in the head and to come through is simply marvelous.

(Georges Vanier to mother, 15 Jan 1916)

Born on 18 May 1880, in Sherbrooke, Quebec Arthur Édouard Dubuc was a civil engineer in the Department of Public Works. A member of the Corps of Guides since 1908, he enlisted as a captain with the 22nd Battalion in November 1914.

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Lt. Col. Combe

Lieutenant Colonel Barry Combe
161st (Huron) Battalion

Had an attack of acute gastritis Aug 1917. Began to feel somewhat run down then and to lose weight.

He is slightly pale and his muscles show wasting—weight 160 lbs. He states that this is a loss of 20 lbs. He complains of being very easily tired, then he feels slightly dizzy.

(Medical Board, 11 Oct 1918)

Hugh Barry Combe was born on 23 September 1864 in Clinton, Canada West. He enlisted as a bugler in the 33rd Huron Regiment as a boy and rose to become the commanding militia officer. In December 1915, he offered to raise a battalion from his home county. The farmer families of the rural area were unreceptive to patriotic pleas, however, and largely unwilling to allow their sons to enlist.

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