Lt. Col. Worsnop

Lieutenant Colonel Charlie Worsnop
50th & 75th Battalions

Worsnop

Major Worsnop, who is heavy and strong in physique, was a source of strength to any forward line, and one of his most notable achievements was to kick off, catch the ball on the bounce, touch down, and kick the goal.

(Vancouver World, 31 Jan 1916, 2)

Born on 5 August 1879 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Charles Benson Worsnop was the son of British Colonel Charles Arthur Benson. Due to his connection with British museums of science and art, his father had travelled to Philadelphia for the 1876 Centennial Exposition and stayed for five years before moving to Canada. The younger Worsnop grew up in British Columbia and joined the 6th Regiment. A noted Vancouver sportsman, the six-foot-three Worsnop excelled as the city’s rugby captain and later team coach.

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Lt. Col. Leach

Lieutenant Colonel Francis Leach
231st (Seaforth Highlanders) Battalion

Before very long you will be going overseas–an event to which I know you have all been anxiously looking forward, and you will then have the honour of taking your place beside the brave lads who have preceded you.

(Lt. Col. Leach, January 1917)

Francis Easton Leach was a graduate of the Royal Military College and a veteran of the Boer War. A native of Montreal, he was born on 24 November 1875. After doing survey work in South Africa, he was employed as a railway engineer in British Columbia. He joined the 72nd Regiment after the outbreak of the Great War and was eventually authorized to raise the 231st Battalion from Vancouver in 1916.

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Lt. Col. Winsby

Lieutenant Colonel W.N. Winsby
47th (British Columbia) Battalion
Winsby

Had long interview with Col. Winsby, 47th Bn. over charges made against his ability as C.O. by Gen. Hilliam, & I gave him until tomorrow morning to send me in, in writing, his answer to these charges.

(Gen. Watson, 4th Division, 8 Mar 1917)

The charges against Winsby are of so contrived a character and now so serious to his battalion and brigade, that I am compelled to recommend his removal from command.

(Gen. Watson, 4th Division, 20 Mar 1917)

William Norman Winsby was a Victoria teacher, principal and school inspector. He was born on 28 October 1874 in Leyburn, Yorkshire, England. He was a twenty-year member of the 5th Regiment and succeeded Arthur Currie as commanding officer in January 1914. At the end of that year, he received authorization to raise the 47th Battalion from New Westminster in November. Continue reading

Lt. Col. Bott

Lieutenant Colonel J. C. L. Bott
2nd Canadian Mounted RiflesBott

I was not drunk on the 3rd of Oct 1916 … I had nothing to drink since 12:30pm on that day. I had a drink in the morning with Major Laws and I had three more … I brought a bottle of whiskey on the morning in question … As a rule I take about five drinks a day. Spread out through the day. I never have a drink alone.

(Lt. Col. Bott, general court martial, 7 Nov 1916)

Born in Marden, Wiltshire, England on 24 August 1872, John Cecil Latham Bott was a professional British soldier and cavalryman. He was a member of the 20th Hussars from 1895 to 1909, and served in Egypt and South Africa. He immigrated to Vernon, British Columbia after the Boer War and helped to organize the 30th Horse.

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Lt. Col. Ross

Lieutenant Colonel Lorne Ross, D.S.O.
67th (Western Scots) Battalion
Ross

He followed Duty’s guidance/ O’er wide continent and sea,
To the blood-stained fields of France/ Where men battled to be free.

Amid the ruin and carnage,/ The thunder of gun and shell.
Facing grim death with courage./ Fearless he fought and fell.

There where night’s benediction/ Breathes quiet o’er the silent sod.
Waiting the bless’d resurrection/ He rests in peace with his God.

(Lorne Ross, Canada in Khaki, 178)

Born on 26 November 1878 in Montreal, Quebec, Lorne Ross was a banker in Victoria, British and had served for over thirteen years in several militia regiments including the 13th, the 22nd and the 29th. In 1913, he joined the 50th Gordon Highlanders as a major under the command of Colonel Arthur W. Currie. In September 1914, Ross enlisted at Valcartier and sailed with the CEF overseas.

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Lt. Col. Latta

Lieutenant Colonel W.S. Latta
29th (Vancouver) Battalion
Latta

He led his battalion in an attack against a village, outstripping the troops on his left, as well as the guns and tanks. In this difficult, situation he handled his battalion with such skill that he reached his final objective with, comparatively small loss. He has at all times displayed fine leadership in action until severely wounded.

(2nd Bar D.S.O. Citation, Gazette, 4 Dec 1918, 4380)

Born in Ayr, Scotland on 14 April 1879, William Smith Latta was a British Columbia bookkeeper and member of the 6th Duke of Connaught Regiment. He was commissioned into the 29th Battalion at the rank of major and succeeded Lieutenant Colonel John Munro Ross in command on 23 July 1917. Multiple times decorated for bravery, he received the Distinguished Service Order and two Bars.

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Lt. Col. Gilson

Lieutenant Colonel W.F. Gilson, D.S.O.
7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion
Gilson

Referring to the untrained men who won so brave a reputation, Col. Gilson said in talking with a German clergyman he used the word but could not induce him to alter his opinion: “How can you state Canada had no professional soldiers? These men are fully trained and regulars of the finest class.”

(Chilliwack Progress, 15 May 1919, 8)

Born in India on 1 May 1877, William Forbes Gilson was a veteran of the West African Frontier Field Force. Enlisting in the CEF as a sergeant, within two years Gilson rose to command the 7th Battalion. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order on 18 October 1917, a D.S.O. Bar for actions of 8 August 1918 and a second D.S.O. Bar for gallantry on 2 September 1918. Continue reading

Lt. Col. Gardner

Lieutenant Colonel Stan Gardner, M.C.†
7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion
Gardner

Lieut.-Col. Gardner is known and respected not only as a fighting man and successful officer, but also a true friend to the soldier who does his duty as it should be done.

(Daily Colonist, 15 Sept 1916, 5)

Born in London, England on 22 August 1880, Stanley Douglas Gardner was a member of the 22nd London Regiment before immigrating to British Columbia. A veteran of the Canadian Mounted Rifles in the Boer War, he enlisted as a captain with the 7th Battalion in September 1914. Stanley was soon appointed battalion adjutant but he was seriously wounded at Festubert on 25 May 1915 and invalided to England. Continue reading

Lt. Col. Holmes

Lieutenant Colonel W.J.H. Holmes
48th (British Columbia) Battalion
Holmes

He did not salute, so immediately after passing I stopped, turned back and asked him “what’s the matter. Why didn’t you salute?” He swiftly looked at me without taking his hand out of it pocket … His manner appeared to be so insubordinate that I asked him for his paybook … I then ordered him under close arrest.

(Court martial of Pte. Parents, 4 Jan 1919)

William Josiah Hartley Holmes was a graduate of the Royal Military College, a British Columbia land surveyor and first commanding officer of the 102nd Rocky Mountain Rangers. He was born on 28 May 1871 in St. Catherines, Ontario but moved to Victoria with his family. In 1910, Holmes was part of an expedition to explore Crown Mountain. Although he had retired to the reserve militia list in 1912, he was appointed commander of the 48th Battalion after the outbreak of the First World War.

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Lt. Col. Hulme

Lieutenant Colonel J.H.D. Hulme
62nd (Hulme’s Huskies) Battalion
Hulme

But, in relinquishing the command of the first troops to leave Vancouver, Colonel Hulme, commanding the Sixth, was actually self-sacrificing, and logical. Major McHarg had had war experience in South Africa as a sergeant; Colonel Hulme had no war service at all, and at that time, and to soldiers especially, war service was considered far more essential to command than later, when all manner of business men rose to high military station and rank.

 To let Major McHarg take the first body of men to the front was proper to a logical mind. But it brought unkind thought, and some criticism from the less thoughtful.

(Major J. S. Matthews, Early Vancouver, Volume V, 1945, 136)

John Herbert Donaldson Hulme was a British Columbia lawyer with thirty years of service in the militia. He was born in Belleville, Ontario on 14 July 1867. He had settled in Vancouver in 1904 after travelling west to the Yukon during the gold rush. As the commanding officer of the 6th Regiment, Hulme was expected to lead his militiamen to Valcartier in August 1914 to join the First Contingent. To the surprise of his second-in-command, Hulme appointed Major W. Hart-McHarg to lead the battalion overseas in his stead. Continue reading