Lt. Col. Mersereau

Lieutenant Colonel G.W. Mersereau
132nd (North Shore) Battalion
Mersereau

At no time since the 132nd Battalion began to recruit have there been any disturbances of any nature whatsoever, and to say that there has been rioting or other similar disturbances is an utter absurdity and a grave injustice to the young men whom we all should honour.

 (Campbellton Mayor A. A. Andrews to MP Charles Marcil, 16 Feb 1916)

George William Mersereau was a graduate of the University of New Brunswick, an educator for thirty years and provincial inspector of public schools since 1884. He was born in Blackville on 9 July 1852. He had belonged to the 73rd Regiment for twenty-five years until his retirement several years before the First World War. In November 1915, Mersereau was appointed to command the 132nd Battalion mobilized from Chatham.

Three of Colonel Mersereau’s sons also served in uniform. His eldest, Major Fred Hayes Mersereau joined the 12th Battalion before returning to Canada in order to join his father’s battalion as second in command. Born on 19 August 1878, he was a member of the 73rd Regiment and a North West Mounted Policeman.

Major Charles Jack Mersereau, D.S.O., born on 13 July 1880, served with the 10th Battalion at the second battle of Ypres. He returned home disabled after suffering a shrapnel wound to the head. He later helped to recruit for the 236th Battalion and commanded the 25th Battalion at the end of the war

The youngest, Dr. Harry Coleman Mersereau was born on 14 October 1882. He had served with the Royal Canadian Regiment for over a year before joining the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

In October 1916, the 132nd Battalion arrived in England, where it was absorbed into the 13th Reserve Battalion. Mersereau went to France as the commander of the 2nd Infantry Division Base Depot at Estaples. He returned to Canada in poor health following demobilization. He attempted to return to his school inspector career but the work was too strenuous.

He died on 20 August 1922 at the age of seventy.

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